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Defying the Odds

Defying the Odds
New book about the 2016 election.

Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Biden on the Electoral Vote

In Defying the Odds, we discuss the 2016 campaign, where Trump openly encouraged violence.  His legal challenges to the election of Joseph Biden have toggled between appalling and farcical.    But his base continues to believe the bogus narrative.

 From President-elect Biden's statement on the formal vote of the electors:

In America, when questions are raised about the legitimacy of any election, those questions are resolved through a legal process.

And that is precisely what happened here.

The Trump campaign brought dozens and dozens and dozens of legal challenges to test the results.

They were heard. And they were found to be without merit.

Time and again, President Trump’s lawyers presented their arguments to state officials, state legislatures, state and federal courts, and ultimately to the United States Supreme Court, twice.

They were heard by more than 80 judges across the country.

And in every case, no cause or evidence was found to reverse or question or dispute the results.

A few states went to recounts. All of the counts were confirmed.

The results in Georgia were counted three times. It did not change the outcome.

The recount conducted in Wisconsin actually saw our margin grow.

The margin we had in Michigan was fourteen times the margin President Trump won the state by four years ago.

Our margin in Pennsylvania was nearly twice the size of President Trump’s margin four years ago.

And yet none of this has stopped baseless claims about the legitimacy of the results.

Even more stunning, 17 Republican Attorneys General and 126 Republican Members of Congress actually signed on to a lawsuit filed by the State of Texas. It asked the United States Supreme Court to reject the certified vote counts in Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

This legal maneuver was an effort by elected officials in one group of states to try to get the Supreme Court to wipe out the votes of more than twenty million Americans in other states and to hand the presidency to a candidate who lost the Electoral College, lost the popular vote, and lost each and every one of the states whose votes they were trying to reverse.

It’s a position so extreme we’ve never seen it before. A position that refused to respect the will of the people, refused to respect the rule of law, and refused to honor our Constitution.

Thankfully, a unanimous Supreme Court immediately and completely rejected this effort.

The Court sent a clear signal to President Trump and his allies that they would be no part of this unprecedented assault on our democracy.

Every avenue was made available to President Trump to contest the results.

He took full advantage of each and every one of these avenues.

President Trump was denied no course of action he wanted to take.

He took his case to Republican Governors and Republican Secretaries of State. To Republican state legislatures. To Republican-appointed judges at every level.

And in a case decided after the Supreme Court’s latest rejection, a judge appointed by President Trump wrote: “This court has allowed the plaintiff the chance to make his case, and he has lost on the merits.”

Even President Trump’s own cybersecurity chief overseeing our elections said it was the most secure in American history.

Let me say it again, his own cybersecurity chief overseeing this election said it was the most secure in American history.

Respecting the will of the people is at the heart of our democracy — even when we find those results hard to accept.

But that is the obligation of those who have taken a sworn duty to uphold our Constitution.

Four years ago, as the sitting Vice President of the United States, it was my responsibility to announce the tally of the Electoral College votes that elected Donald Trump.

I did my job.

And I am pleased — but not surprised — that a number of my former Republican colleagues in the Senate have acknowledged the results of the Electoral College.

I thank them. I am convinced we can work together for the good of the nation.