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Defying the Odds

Defying the Odds
New book about the 2016 election.

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Survey on Tax Arguments

In its latest poll analysis, Resurgent Republic candidly acknowledges that the "balanced approach/fair share" argument has an edge over the "no new taxes" argument:
  • Neither conservative response tested opposing all tax increases defeats the liberal call for a "balanced approach" that has everyone paying "their fair share." The survey phrased the call for tax increases as:

    Congressman A says that Congress needs to take a balanced approach to our debt problem by raising taxes on the wealthiest Americans and biggest corporations. They should pay their fair share by giving up tax breaks and special deductions.

    The survey tested two options in response, with the first phrased as:

    Congressman B says this is the wrong time to raise taxes on anyone. Higher taxes mean more money going to the government, and less money in the economy that businesses can use to hire workers and create new jobs.

    With that formulation, the argument for higher taxes leads the argument against tax increases by 54 to 42 percent, including Democrats at 71 to 26 percent and Independents at 53 to 44 percent. Republicans oppose tax increases by 60 to 38 percent.

    The other response was:

    Congressman B says this is the wrong time to raise taxes on anyone. The top ten percent of earners already pay over two-thirds of all federal income taxes, while nearly half of Americans pay no federal income tax, and U.S. companies pay a thirty-five percent tax rate, more than most European countries.

    The second response does somewhat better than the first, but only marginally. With that formulation, the argument for higher taxes leads the argument against tax increases by 53 to 43 percent, with Democrats at 74 to 25 percent and Independents at 48 to 46 percent. Republicans oppose raising taxes by 59 to 38 percent.