Search This Blog

Thursday, October 11, 2012

DNC Chair: Wrong, But Not False

In August, Politico reported on dissatisfaction with Debbie Wasserman Schultz:
Many of Obama’s advisers have quietly begun questioning whether they should have picked Wasserman Schultz, an outspoken Florida congresswoman, as his DNC chairwoman. She has clashed with Chicago over her choice of staff and air-time on national TV shows — and they think she comes across as too partisan over the airwaves
Obama’s brain trust secretly commissioned pollster David Binder to conduct an internal focus study of the popularity of top Obama campaign surrogates. Number one was former press secretary Robert Gibbs, followed by Cutter. Traveling press secretary Jen Psaki, who was added to a second study, was third. Axelrod, Plouffe and current White House press secretary Jay Carney were bunched in the middle. Wasserman Schultz ranked at the bottom.
Her recent exchange with Piers Morgan probably confirms these doubts:
Piers Morgan, CNN: The really important horse that should be flogged is the behavior and the statements of those who are in positions of responsibility and we would assume knowledge. And it's pretty unAmerican, pretty unAmerican to be putting up completely false statements before you know the facts, isn't it?
Debbie Wasserman Schultz, DNC chair: Piers, it is not okay for you to be saying that the administration was putting out completely false statements. They put out information that they had at the time based on the intelligence that they were given --
Piers Morgan: That turned out to be completely wrong.
Wasserman Schultz: Well that doesn't mean it was false. It doesn't mean that it was deliberate. It means that.
Morgan: What?! Now wait a minute. If you put out a false statement, then it's false, it's wrong. It's both of those things.